4th of July – Carl Broemel

Indie Folk/Indie Rock

If albums were seasons Carl Broemel’s 4th of July would be summer. This album is a great candidate for your sitting by the pool, relaxing, drinking a beer chill-out album of the summer this year. While the holiday weekend may be a bit off I thought this would be a great album to write about on this beautiful Memorial Day weekend. Carl Bromel’s 4th of July is a stunning album that you may have missed last year and should be added to your summer song playlist immediately.

When most people hear the name My Morning Jacket they may be reminded of frontman Jim James. This is for a good reason given Jim’s adept vocal and instrumental ability. This being said, lead guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Carl Broemel is easily one of the most talented people on MMJ’s roster and the rock scene as a whole nowadays. Upon listening to Carl’s solo work it is easy to hear his large influence and contribution to MMJ’s music. Carl’s solo work strays from MMJ’s and favors a laid back folk approach that features Carl’s instrumental abilities in a large way.

4th of July is the third solo release from the Indianapolis born, Louisville based musician. Unlike many musicians in today’s musical landscape Carl is classically trained and proficient not only on guitar but also saxophone and pedal steel among other instruments. Carl’s broad ranging instrumental skills can be heard loud and clear on 4th of July even if they are not the most excited renditions we are used to hearing on the MMJ records.

4th of July is reminiscent of a summertime daydream and can be that perfect album to help you detach from any stress in life that may be plaguing you. After all, the album does start with a track entitled Sleepy Lagoon. The album is fairly short with only eight tracks although two of which do exceed the seven minute mark.

The title track 4th of July is a main attraction on the album and is also the longest spanning over ten minutes in length. The track is dreamy and detached and is the one song on the album that highlights Carl’s instrumental approach the best. The track starts off as relaxed as most on the album but quickly transforms into something more engaging and eventually tapers off slowly with Carl’s mystifying guitar work. This track will remind you of Carl’s influence on MMJ’s sound with its similarly entrancing sound.

One of my personal favorites off 4th is Rockingchair Dancer a four minute drifting berceuse who’s lyrics discuss the realities of aging. Try not to fall asleep but if you do it will be a nice way to drift off. Lyrically the track Snowflake is the highlight off the record. The lyrics are innocent and features lines such as Every raindrop’s the same, you’re no snowflake. It’s a nice and simple song and sometimes that is welcome on a relaxing day.

I highly recommend giving Carl Broemel’s 4th of July a listen. For those of you who are looking for an unwinding album for the summer months look no further than 4th of July. Carl is a main contributor to the big sound of My Morning Jacket and that is easy to hear in his solo work. From exciting guitar solos to mystifying saxophone to country pedal steel melodies there is a lot to like about Carl Broemel’s musical ability. My only request is that on his next release we get a longer record. I could use another four tracks in addition to the existing eight on this record. Carl should take that as a compliment!

See you next week.

The Phosphorescent Blues – Punch Brothers

Progressive Bluegrass

This week I would like to highlight one of the most recent additions to my list of favorite albums. This band also happens to include of my most respected musicians of all time Chris Thile. The Phosphorescent Blues by Punch Brothers is an amazing achievement in the modern Progressive Bluegrass scene and should not be overlooked. Seriously, I am not exaggerating.

I would assume that most people reading this right now are thinking what the hell is progressive bluegrass? Well, the answer is that there is no real set-in-stone definition. The best way to describe progressive bluegrass is as a modern subgroup or subgenre of traditional bluegrass music that has the liberty of adding instruments and incorporating styles that traditional bluegrass would not. Please don’t be intimidated by the bluegrass designation; many people who are fans of folk or rock music will find this music easy to approach.

Most of you who are familiar with the traditional bluegrass format would expect to see an acoustic banjo, mandolin, guitar, fiddle (violin), upright bass, and sometimes a dobro. What is interesting about modern variations of bluegrass music is that you will often hear electric instruments, drums, and incorporated style elements of folk and rock music. This allows the musicians a little more creative freedom and flexibility. In addition to Punch Brothers you may already know some other progressive bluegrass groups such as Greensky Bluegrass, Trampled by Turtles, and Yonder Mountain Sting Band to name a few.

Now that the lecture is over I will try and get back on topic! The Phosphorescent Blues is an admirably complex and beautiful addition to the modern bluegrass catalog. It is easy to hear that each musician in Punch Brothers is a master of their respective instruments. This is certainly true of Chris Thile who is known as one of the best (many feel the best) mandolin players alive (see Chris Thile Plays Bach: Sonata No, 1 in G Minor on Youtube). As an amateur mandolin player I not only have a tremendous amount of respect for his approach to the mandolin but also his success in bringing notoriety to the instrument in modern times. Chris also plays the part of lead vocals and does so very well.

I feel like I have already said a lot so I will avoid a track-by-track here. This being said I encourage you to give this album a shot. As I mentioned, this album is one of my current favorites and may become one of yours as well. Some of my favorite tracks include: My Oh My, Julep, Magnet, Little Lights, and the ten minute and twenty three second opener Familiarity. I should also note that the video that I posted for My Oh My (my favorite song off the album) is not the record version but instead the version with Chris Thile from The Late Show. I feel that it is an excellent live rendition. I hope you enjoy it.

See you next week.

The Definitive Collection – J.J. Cale

Classic Rock / Blues

If you continue to read my blog there is a good chance you will not see me post another collection or “best of” album for a long time. I am just not big on them. They are so often hit or miss. Many best of albums pick all of the most popular hits from the artists library and put them all together on one disc while leaving out some truly great songs that may be equally (or more) deserving. All of this being said I could not resist posting about J.J. Cale’s 1997 album The Definitive Collection which successfully focuses on his best work. This is a collection album that really deserves to be listened to.

Many of you may already know at least two of Cale’s songs on this collection; Cocaine and After Midnight which were both famously covered and popularized by Eric Clapton. Aside from these two familiars there are so many other songs to love on this 20 song, one hour album.

This album truly highlights Cale’s one of a kind rock/blues/Americana/country (with a touch of Cajun!) sound that has since been known as Tulsa Sound after Cale’s hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Much of Clapton’s music is also categorized as Tulsa Sound. Additionally, the two artists had very intertwined careers both through influencing each other and recording quite a bit of music together including the Grammy award winning 2006 album The Road to Escondido.

I usually post two songs at the end of my write-up here for you to listen to and I have to say that choosing the songs this week was not easy; there are so many gems here. I will not post Cocaine or After Midnight because so many of you are already familiar with those songs. I will tell you that some of my personal favorites besides Cocaine and After Midnight include Magnolia, Lies, Cajun Moon, I’ll Make Love to You Anytime, and Mama Don’t. One puzzling omission on this album is Cale’s Traveling Light which is one of his best songs and was later covered and further popularized by Widespread Panic. With all of the quality music here I think I can forgive them for that!

See you next week.